The True Barry

2 Aug

Never underestimate the power of music and brotherhood. The Barry brothers are proof of this sentiment. The band, Barry, was founded in 2011 by three brothers, who, despite having other commitments – like families, jobs and school – gathered in their self-made studio in Western, New York, and cut a fresh folk-rock album that oozes with such a cornucopia of sounds that I’m not sure how to label the music. The best I can do is alternative-inspired folk churned with harmony and a pleasant hint of country. I believe this description is suitable, but this is music you just want to lose yourself in. You can make your own judgment after experiencing their debut EP Yawnin’ in the Dawnin’ which was released on May 19. You can take a listen to some tracks below.


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The Barry brothers are from Hume, New York. Just for some perspective, Manhattan is close to six hours away from Hume. New York. That is how far west they are. And I do think their location has an influence on their sound. It is agrestic, taking on the feel of rich farmland and open skies. Music like this cannot be created in a big city. This natural, old-time folk needs to bake in a town where the cacophony of screaming taxis and rumbling subways is not pervasive, and where when night falls true dark blankets the town.

The band is made up of Patrick Barry (Vocals, Guitar, Harmonica & Keys), Benjamin Barry (Bass, Vocals) and Bradford Barry (Drums, Vocals) and their musical maturity is on display throughout their first EP.

If I had to pick a favorite song it would be “Carnival(e).” The song combines two awesome elements. The verses are odd, but they match the carnival lyric well. The music moves up and down like a bouncing ball. The chorus strikes and the rhythm of the verse is replaced by a fast-paced rhythm and vocal harmony. This transition is skilled and much respected. “Three Years in Carolina,” another exciting song, displays Barry’s country influences. The chorus emits a southern effervescence and the well-placed harmonica helps carry the five-minute Carolina ode.

Check out the band’s:

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