Archive | March, 2017

Sittin’ On The Dock of Gats”Bay”

30 Mar

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Hey Music Court readers. Sorry I have been a bit terse (more like complete radio silence) over the past several weeks. It often does seem that I lose big chunks of time when I’m busy. That said, I am back with another literary/music mix because as an English teacher I cannot contain myself.

There are some songs that contain an untenable eeriness to them, and Otis Redding’s “Sittin’ On The Dock of the Bay” is one of them. Otis Redding, whose promising career was tragically cut short because of a plane crash, recorded the song days before the crash. The melancholic but peaceful whistle at the song’s fade was, as the story goes, supposed to be an ad-lib spoken word by Redding, but he forgot it and instead whistled – which perhaps is the most known part of the song now. He never had a chance to correct this extemporaneous ending.

I want to focus, though, on the lyric (of course). In the song, Redding paints an image of littoral beauty, a depiction of matutinal beauty from his houseboat. The song, which features the existential reflection of Redding sitting and watching the sea, makes me think of Jay Gatsby, another character – albeit fictional – who spends time staring at the water with a sense of longing. In a sense, Gatsby is revealed through Redding’s lyric, “Looks like nothing’s gonna change; Everything still remains the same.” Redding clearly does not want his perfect visage to end, and Gatsby, similarly, does not want his perfect image of Daisy Buchanan, his first and only love, to change. That said, life does get in the way, and Redding and Gatsby both meet unfortunate ends because, let’s face it, everything changes. In our memory, though, we will always have the bay.

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Captain of the Waves Spins A Whole New World In Hidden Gems-Chapter 1

30 Mar

With Captain of the Waves eclectic foreign sound ringing in listener’s ears, the themes of the ocean, life, and serenity are all present in Hidden Gems-Chapter 1. The strong voices throughout the album set the tone comparable to that of storytelling and the narrator setting up the scene. Compared to a “a cabin crew” of musicians, the sounds of the accordion, double bass, mandolin, banjo & miscellaneous percussion encompasses a wordly sound centered as well on the sounds of the Bouzouki and Ukulele.
A ‘cabin crew’ of accordion, double bass, mandolin, banjo & pitter patter percussion adding to the Captain’s voices, accompanied by his Bouzouki/Ukulele, were the nucleus of the noise evident on the debut album. Captain of the Lost Waves combines the traditional sound of black cabaret with the stories of a traveler in a planned and intentional way that informs listeners that their ambiance has been no mistake.

Silver Lake 66 Pulls At Listeners Heartstrings In Let Go Or Be Dragged

29 Mar

Silver Lake 66 makes listeners very aware of their full bodied sound that exemplifies the epitome of Americana sound. In their debut album, Let Go or Be Dragged, stories about Little Rock, life, and travels are prominent themes throughout. The effortless combination of Maria Francis and Jeff Overbo meshes together to form a signature and connecting sound within their music. The arrangement of the songs proves strong with Overbo’s guitar work and light percussion in the background of the prominent tracks on the album. The overall style of their songwriting definitely alludes to traditional country and Americana standards, but with a soulful and modern twist in the present.

For more listening:

Eddie Yang Encompasses Soulful Sound With Split The Night

17 Mar

Eddy Yang debuts with his newest single Split the Night and it encompasses everything one could think of when thinking of an artist with soul power. The sound of his music can only be characterized as reflective, yet has a full and folk inspired rhythm. Influenced by a wide variety of artists ranging from Beach House to Kanye West, Yang gives himself just a start into a peek in his debut upon the indie music scene. Eddy Yang proves himself as an indie musician who gives listeners a raw and full sound destined for greatness in the future.

For more listening:

Pacific Radio Has The Catchy Tunes Your Playlist Craves

7 Mar

 

Quick Editor’s Note: Please help the Music Court welcome a new writer to the ever-growing Music Court mold; Kylie Banks. Kylie will be reporting on some excellent tunes, so keep an eye out for her posts. – Matt

It may be cold in LA (as a Floridian, I consider anything under 60 degrees freezing), but you better believe I’m already creating my summer playlist. And Pacific Radio is definitely on it.

I got a chance to see Pacific Radio at It’s A School Night!, a live show that the Hollywood venue Bardot puts on every Monday night. My friend Zoe and I decided to see what this band was all about. And I’m thrilled we did.

I first noticed lead singer Joe Robinson’s leggings. I’m not sure if I’ve ever see tighter leggings, and, to be honest, I’m not sure I ever will. But even tighter than the leggings was this foursome’s set. Even though I hadn’t heard a single song from this band, their performance had me dancing like a maniac before the first song even finished. After their energetic set, I knew I had to sit down and listen to their discography.

The only disappointing aspect about the Kitchen Table EP was the length – at only four songs, it leaves you wanting more. The first track “Kitchen Table” is incredibly catchy, with the band singing about a tape deck thrown out a window. Of all the songs on the EP, this was the song that I couldn’t get out of my head for days after the live show. Though the second track “Katie” is about unrequited love, it’s upbeat, fun and completely relatable. Additionally, as a transplanted Angeleno with the occasional bout of homesickness, the song “LA Is Pretty (But It’s Killing Me)” has a special place in my heart. I especially loved the violin they incorporated-I’m a sucker for rock bands that bust out the strings for slower tracks. The last song, “Tight Jeans,” is the perfect track to blare for a night out on the town. This song was amazing live-the entire band joined in for the chorus of “Nah Nah Nah’s!” And it wasn’t long before I did, too.

If you’re interested in hearing your new summer soundtrack, check out the Kitchen Table EP below:

-Kylie

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