Tag Archives: Psychedelic rock

The Sparkling Black By Aura Blaze Channels The Feel Good Music of Space Rock

8 Jun

Aura Blaze’s album The Sparkling Black carries all the elements of space rock into 2019 with a cadence that is unreal. Set to release June 21 in the intentional timing around the beginning of the Summer Solstice, the brainchild of this operation Rhode Rachel has thought of everything. From the beginning of the album setting the foundation of their out of world sound and the story of their music space, it makes listeners think they are in an observatory museum with those audio headphones prepared to consume the facts and nuances of a world unknown. The middle of the album shifts around with the musical varieties and the heavy rock influence as well. It forces listeners to shift what they were listening to earlier in the album to adapt to the heavy, but almost orchestra  sort of rock. The perfect blend of new age and futuristic rock and the influences of classic rock make The Sparkling Black more than a masterpiece.

For more listening: Good While It Lasted

Post Death Soundtrack Explores The Inner Workings of Life, Emotion,and Connection

25 Jul

With the sounds of Post Death Soundtrack only to be described as pure and dark, this Canadian band does not disappoint in their latest album. Possessing the musical characteristics of modern industrial rock, Post Death Soundtrack also offers listeners a chance at exploring the deep complexities of life and emotion. With members of Kenneth Buck, Steve Moore, and Jon Ireson, Post Death Soundtrack unites together on the album, The Unlearning Curve. The song, Beauty Eyes I Adore (Dark Highway Mix) stands out on the album with themes of over adoration, love, and the blurred lines of perception within the track itself. The track opens with a mysterious, yet serene sound at first, keeping listeners ears open wide. With lyrics heavy on soul, bleeding hearts, and the effects of a gaze, the theme of connections presents itself as well. Overall the album, The Unlearning Curve does not disappoint with its deep narratives about healing, soul transformation, and the workings of a dreaming mind as well.

For more listening:

Spencer Sabo Spins A World Of Galaxies, Grunge, And Instrumental Genius

9 Jan

download (8)

Close your eyes and Spencer Sabo will take you away literally in another dimension with his latest album, entitled Color In The Gray Machine. The feelings of another world, powered by an undertone of galactic space and ethereal fluidity goes nicely with the fitting project, which is called Mind The Journey. Upon listening to the newly released album, one can almost find an undertone of nostalgia and psych rock as well within the sounds and strategic musical arrangement. The track, Rose Colored Glasses builds up an almost synth dynamic with a touch of grit and borderline 90s gritty grunge sound. The vocals are drawn out in a smoothing whirlwind and the instrumental genius builds an environment for the already strong standalone song. On the other end of the spectrum, Dessert almost sets up a very mellow, yet reflective ambiance, almost exhibiting strong reminders of glam rock. Recorded in Boston native’s Sabo’s studio, Color In The Gray Machine delivers an album centered around retro sounds and its coexistence in a modern world.

Take A Listen To Rose Glasses:

 

The Psychedelic Experiment – Art Rock – Emerson Lake & Palmer “The Three Fates”

27 Apr

Totally Arting It Up

Psychedelic music inspired many talented performers to explore rock n’ roll’s endless possibilities. At its root, psychedelic music is experimental, and like any pioneering scientific discoveries, it engenders more research and, well, experimenting. While psychedelic music has numerous sub-genres, even more striking is the amount of genre manipulation that happened after the wave of psychedelia came to a near-end in the late 1960’s. I say near-end because psychedelic music never truly ended. But since it experienced a wave of popularity in the mid-late 60’s, it naturally became less popular. I know that I called this section the 60’s psychedelic experiment, but it is equally important to describe music that was created directly after the initial boom. I’m talking about the early 1970’s, which saw the rise of progressive rock and art rock, two genres that owe their creation to the success of psychedelic music. In a sense, art and progressive rock are both the complex expansion of psychedelic experimentation featuring music that concentrates on intricate and lengthy melodies combined with either a classical musical approach or more modern representation.

How did that paragraph go down? Smoothly, I hope. Seriously, the progression of Rock music is sometimes bulky, and this time period saw several changes to how rock would evolve. Art and progressive rock evolved from psychedelic music. Emerson, Lake & Palmer (ELP) was composed for Keith Emerson, from the psychedelic rock band The Nice, Greg Lake, from the late 60’s prog-rock band King Crimson, and drummer Carl Palmer who played in the Crazy World of Arthur Brown and Atomic Rooster. These three musicians composed one of the first Art Rock supergroups and their music reached for the classical portion of Art rock.

In my opinion, art and progressive rock are practically the same term. But, one of the key differences is progressive rock tends to focus more on guitars. As evidenced by the piece I am including, ELP swayed more towards piano and keyboards.

“The Three Fates” is the first song off of side two of their debut eponymous album. It is split up into three parts, each named for a mythical figure (Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos). The piano playing is extraordinary. Keith Emerson is skillful beyond words. The ode to classical music is clear and this classifies the music as 1970 Art rock. So, you may be thinking, how does this apply to psychedelic music? Travel to around 5:30 in the song. Okay, this is Jazz-rock. But, wait, what are all of the background sounds and the musical layering and strange notation. Yes, this is psychedelic music of the 1960’s kicked up a notch to fit into the genres of Jazz and Classical. It is Art rock, and a perfect example of the evolution of psychedelic music.

“You’re Gonna Miss Me” by 13th Floor Elevators – Early Psychedelic Garage Rock

8 Mar

Okocim issued a challenge in his last post. He posed the broad question, what is the 60’s psychedelic music? As a single question, I believe it is impossible to answer. The genre expanded into many sub-sections and there is not one sole example of 60’s psychedelic music that I can give to him and say this is your answer. The sub-sections make 60’s psychedelic music unique. Because, in itself, psychedelic cannot be a genre. Psychedelic becomes a genre when it pairs with a type of music (like rock or pop). Therefore, the music is always perpetuating more sub genres because in order to survive it needs to. Following my thinking?

This is why I find psychedelic music (specifically of the 60s variety) to be so intriguing. Psychedelic, in itself, can be esoteric and abstruse. In order to make rock or pop psychedelic, a musician needs to add an oddness to the melodic structure, thereby expanding the listeners mind. Yes, a lot has to do with drugs, but a perfectly sober listener (like myself) can get just as much out of it. The music itself is a drug.

I could not turn down Okocim’s challenge though. I proposed in my comment to him a new sub-section of “Journey To The Center of the Mind” called “The 60’s Psychedelic Experiment.” Damn, this post already sounds like “Inception,” a section inside a genre inside a section. That is what psychedelic music is, in a way. It delves deep into music’s structure, like a genetic mutation, and morphs it into something different (either slightly or tremendously).

I am going to answer Okocim’s question of what is 60’s psychedelic music by exploring different songs by different artists over the course of several weeks, answering the question of what makes it “psychedelic” and what specific genre it finds itself swimming in. We begin with one of the aboriginal psychedelic bands, hailing from Texas (starting in 1965), the 13th Floor Elevators.

At the beginning of the psychedelic rock revolution, the psychedelic garage rock component was strong. Garage rock is generally raw and easily tourable. It needs no special studio effects and is solid the way it is. This made it an easy for psychedelic music to manipulate. It was not the first of its kind, this still being reserved for psychedelic folk that came on the scene 1-2 years earlier. But, it is the first example of psychedelic rock. The Cream and the Beatles would explore psychedelic attributes in their music at around the same time, but of the limited examples of 1965-66 psychedelic music, “You’re Gonna Miss Me,” the 13th Floor Elevators 1966 single, is the best example of early psychedelic garage rock (a sub-section of a sub-section).

Now when I say garage rock, I am talking about the genre that formed in the late 50s, but really blossomed in 1963. Think of “Louie, Louie” by the Kingsmen. It is that ol’fashioned rock. That’s why many consider garage rock to be the distant ancestor of punk, because of its chordal simplicity.

13th Floor Elevators came on the scene two years after garage rock’s blossoming and they transformed the genre with a psychedelic component.

The question posed by Okocim is basically what makes this (and any other song during the time period) 60’s psychedelic and how did it help form the term “60’s psychedelic music” which is just way to large to ever conquer.

Well, the first four chords sounds like a variation of the Yardbirds “For Your Love” which was released a year earlier. The guitar is amplified with a little reverb and a slight echo. Their bluesy sound is original. Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top cites the guitar work as inspirational.

At around 6 seconds, you hear this muffled noise in the background of Roky Erickson and Stacy Sutherland Gibson guitars. That is an electric jug of Tommy Hall. Hall created vocalized sound with the jug that gave each song an underground stutter. This is paired with Erickson’s powerful voice (with bluesy screams).

Hall also inspired band members to record and perform music while on LSD, which was unique during the time.

The best psychedelic rock example occurs at the breakdown at 1:30. Listen to the combination of time. The electric jug competes with the drums while the voices sing “I’m Not Coming Home.” This takes in the psychedelic effect. The jug combined with the reverbed guitars do this. It is garage psychedelic because it is simple, but, it is different from typical garage rock examples because it adds different elements that make the music more acid-inspired and art-based.

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