Tag Archives: The Beatles

The Sparkling Black By Aura Blaze Channels The Feel Good Music of Space Rock

8 Jun

Aura Blaze’s album The Sparkling Black carries all the elements of space rock into 2019 with a cadence that is unreal. Set to release June 21 in the intentional timing around the beginning of the Summer Solstice, the brainchild of this operation Rhode Rachel has thought of everything. From the beginning of the album setting the foundation of their out of world sound and the story of their music space, it makes listeners think they are in an observatory museum with those audio headphones prepared to consume the facts and nuances of a world unknown. The middle of the album shifts around with the musical varieties and the heavy rock influence as well. It forces listeners to shift what they were listening to earlier in the album to adapt to the heavy, but almost orchestra  sort of rock. The perfect blend of new age and futuristic rock and the influences of classic rock make The Sparkling Black more than a masterpiece.

For more listening: Good While It Lasted

Andy The Crocodile Brings Memories & The Element of Swoon In Scars & Wounds

22 May

Andy The Crocodile’s Scars & Wounds sound jump starts a memory bank of hearing 1950s music for the first time and the swooning tones of the instrumentals. It has a perfect melting pot of a variety of genres all spun into one. The creation of this album has been on a path of seven years as its process. His name by birth though is Anand Manivannan and he prides himself on with a mixture of formal music studies and the wonderful world of Youtube cast him even more so into the world of music making. Heavily influenced by The Fray, The Beatles, and classical Indian music, he brings something unique to the music world. He has the ability to transport his listeners to a specific time, add his formal and informal music knowledge, and add a stylistic twist to his sound. With his talent and ability to create his own universe where his music lives, listeners will not have to wait long. Mark your calendars, as June 8th will mark the release of Scars & Wounds for everyone to hear.

For more listening: La Vie En Rose Cover

 

 

Damon Mitchell’s Elise Hypnotizes Listeners In The Sound of Rock & Grit

25 Jan

Upon first listening to Elise, listeners will hear Damon Mitchell‘s heartfelt grit when singing in his recent single. “Your dark demand that I do not share, you break the ice and put it on your bruise” showcases just some of the lyrics within the song that point towards this complicated character that Mitchell sings about. The tone of his angst and the background of Elise also showcase the dark qualities of this woman that we can speculate was an ex-girlfriend. Heavily inspired by mid 60s Beatles, listeners also hear a dash of 70s grunge and rock sounds within the song as well. If you think that you will be disappointed by this EP, this single track should turn that mindset around. In addition to this enticing song to set the groundwork, stand-out artists will make musical appearances on the EP. Featuring musicians such as Charlie McCoy (Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel) and Tris Imboden (Chicago, Kenny Loggins), etc, Damon Mitchell delivers this album with all of his heart & soul.

For more listening:

Paul Orwell tells all in video for single, “Tell Me Tell Me”

15 Sep

Psychedelic rock is a very enduring genre. Though it has changed over the years, the feeling it evokes remains intact. Today, we have artists such as Tame Impala and Unknown Mortal Orchestra, but I still have a soft spot for sixties rock-pop, the first incarnation of psych rock. The Beatles are important to anyone’s musical self-discovery, and some current bands can capture that old school sound very well. I think Paul Orwell is one of them.

In his newest single, “Tell Me Tell Me,” Orwell and his band The Night Falls make a Britpop song straight from 1963. The echoing in the vocals and twangs in the guitar strums make this modern song feel as if it were written decades earlier. Not to mention that Orwell plays the part; he’s aloof, and I think if I met him in person he’d just shake his head and mumble some Britishisms. In the video for “Tell Me, Tell Me” he and his band go to a barber shop, seemingly to only annoy the hairdressers. Orwell is too cool for school, and refuses to stop moving around for the haircut, but he doesn’t care how it will turn out. He is similarly indifferent in his video for “Little Reason,” Orwell’s earlier single.

paul orwell

My favorite thing about this London native is his full head of hair. I watched “Tell Me Tell Me” expecting his hair to be a little shorter than it was at the beginning, but he ends up with the same mess of hair that he’s always had. And that’s when I realized, his hair is the joke. He has the same mop in “Little Reason” and even has illustrations that accentuate his overly full head of hair. I think that his wit and songwriting skills will propel him into contemporary popularity, even though he sounds like a contemporary of the Kinks.

For more information on Paul Orwell, visit his Facebook.

Many Matches in the Matchbox

4 Sep

It’s often shocking how often you find yourself unknowingly enjoying a modern incarnation of a song that has its roots embedded in the past. Covers are great, but they spawn histories that are often forgotten. The Blues Evolution is The Music Court’s attempt to combine two engaging topics, music and history, and share tales of popular blues songs that were first recorded before the first rock n’ roll song was ever created.

Today’s song of choice is “Matchbox,” a blues song born in the 1920s and covered 30 years later by Carl Perkins (and later the Beatles). It is also a great example of musical telephone, where Perkins was forced to guess on the lyric of the decade-old blues song, thus creating an entirely new song that simply held the original’s foundation. So, if you will oblige, let’s take a trip down the long stretch of road that is blues history.

Blind Lemon Jefferson

It all begins with Blind Lemon Jefferson. Well, kind of. Blind Lemon was just one of the many ultra-talented blind blues musicians who inspired the eventual creation of rock n’ roll, but he developed “Matchbox” because he was inspired by a lyric in a Ma Rainey song. Blind Lemon, who has been called the Father of Texas Blues, was inspired by Ma Rainey – “The Mother of the Blues.” The blues ancestry works much like mythology, it seems. Blind Lemon and Ma Rainey inspired Robert Johnson, Howlin’ Wolf, and many, many others.

In Ma Rainey’s 1924 record “Lost Wandering Blues,” she sings, “Lord, I’m standing here wondering, Will a matchbox hold my clothes. I’ve got a sun to beat, I’ll be farther down the road.” In a pre-sampling example of sampling, Blind Lemon took that lyric and wrote, “I’m sittin’ here wonderin’ would a matchbox hold my clothes.
I ain’t got so many matches but I got so far to go.” Quite similar, indeed. Blind Lemon’s version of the lyric became more popular, but credit must be given to Ma Rainey as well.

There is Blind Lemon’s high croon and traditional Texas acoustic blues guitar. Gosh, pre-rock n’ roll blues is just awesome, isn’t it? This song was recorded several more times through the 30s and 40s but to no true popularity, though it was through one of these covers that the song was reintroduced to the public.

Thirty years later, Carl Perkins’ father suggested he cover the song in a December, 1956 recording session. Perkins’ father, Buck, was a student of old country music, and several country musicians covered the Blind Lemon song in the 1930s and 40s. He only remembered a few lines of the song. Carl decided to try his luck, and the session pianist, Jerry Lee Lewis (not a bad session pianist!), played a boogie rhythm on the piano. Perkins transformed the song into fast-paced rockabilly…with completely different lyrics.

The line that Blind Lemon adopted from Ma Rainey is still there. It is the only similarity that remains. The song, which Blind Lemon made about a mean woman, became a about a poor boy a long way from home. Here is Carl Perkins performing the song with Johnny Cash and Eric Clapton because we can!

The Beatles, who were inspired by Perkins, had received a request to record a Perkins song, and in 1964 they recorded the song with Perkins himself standing by. Yes, he was invited to the session, and did jam with the band (just not on the track). Ringo was tasked with the vocal responsibilities, and he sang the song while playing his drum set.

From the mother to the father to Mr. Blue Suede Shoes to the greatest band of the 20th century. And to think, I’m sittin’ here wondering if a matchbox will hold my clothes.

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