Tag Archives: New Music

Gorillaz Are On Fire

18 Jun

Image result for the gorillaz fire flies

After a six-year gap between its last two albums (Humanz was released last year), Gorillaz is on the heels of The Now Now, the band’s sixth studio album, which will be released on June 29. Why such a quick turnaround? Well, for all intents and purposes, it seems like Damon Albarn, Blur frontman and Gorillaz lead, feels like he is getting old, and he might as well release as much as he can without waiting another seven years like the last album gap. Seems reasonable enough.

What is not aging is the music. Gorillaz is one of those rare bands that continues findings itself on the cutting edge of music. “Fire Flies,” one of the tracks off the new album, is no exception.

My favorite Gorillaz track in a while, “Fire Flies” takes on a Demon Days feel with its sultry darkness, fit with heavy bass, dreamy synth, and excellent vocal. The persistent rhythm is produced with classic Gorillaz flair, a euphonious concoction of melody. It’s just a tremendous track, continued proof that Gorillaz will keep popping out excellent tunes for as long as they decide to proceed as a group.

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Hidden Roots Shows A Reflective Vibe From Musician luliano

26 May

Intially turning on luliano’s music will make listeners want to reflect on his strong lyrics and effortless sound. On the other hand on some other tracks, listeners will want to dance while listening to the feel good music that luliano creates. Drawing comparisons to the musicians Mika and Devendra Banhart, luliano combines vocal similarities with the sound of electric and nylon guitar strings in the background of his tracks. Listeners can also hear a subtle hint of Toro y Moi within his music as well. Hidden Roots is not only well formed in sound, but tells us just a start of what luliano has in store for the future. Hearing musical inspiration from all around Europe, luliano crafts his sound into something we can all experience when turning on Hidden Roots in our headphones.

For more listening: Who Knows-luliano

Pacific Radio Has The Catchy Tunes Your Playlist Craves

7 Mar

 

Quick Editor’s Note: Please help the Music Court welcome a new writer to the ever-growing Music Court mold; Kylie Banks. Kylie will be reporting on some excellent tunes, so keep an eye out for her posts. – Matt

It may be cold in LA (as a Floridian, I consider anything under 60 degrees freezing), but you better believe I’m already creating my summer playlist. And Pacific Radio is definitely on it.

I got a chance to see Pacific Radio at It’s A School Night!, a live show that the Hollywood venue Bardot puts on every Monday night. My friend Zoe and I decided to see what this band was all about. And I’m thrilled we did.

I first noticed lead singer Joe Robinson’s leggings. I’m not sure if I’ve ever see tighter leggings, and, to be honest, I’m not sure I ever will. But even tighter than the leggings was this foursome’s set. Even though I hadn’t heard a single song from this band, their performance had me dancing like a maniac before the first song even finished. After their energetic set, I knew I had to sit down and listen to their discography.

The only disappointing aspect about the Kitchen Table EP was the length – at only four songs, it leaves you wanting more. The first track “Kitchen Table” is incredibly catchy, with the band singing about a tape deck thrown out a window. Of all the songs on the EP, this was the song that I couldn’t get out of my head for days after the live show. Though the second track “Katie” is about unrequited love, it’s upbeat, fun and completely relatable. Additionally, as a transplanted Angeleno with the occasional bout of homesickness, the song “LA Is Pretty (But It’s Killing Me)” has a special place in my heart. I especially loved the violin they incorporated-I’m a sucker for rock bands that bust out the strings for slower tracks. The last song, “Tight Jeans,” is the perfect track to blare for a night out on the town. This song was amazing live-the entire band joined in for the chorus of “Nah Nah Nah’s!” And it wasn’t long before I did, too.

If you’re interested in hearing your new summer soundtrack, check out the Kitchen Table EP below:

-Kylie

Bonomo Impresses With Evolved Folk Sound In Newest Album Phases

25 Feb

Take a step into serenity mixed with melancholic happiness when you take a listen to Bonomo. Phases characterizes an individual’s journey and meaning of home, memories, and self. Comparing to the lovely sounds of Copeland and Iron & Wine, Bonomo crafts an exemplary sound within his album that’s on the path of evolving, filled with humility and authenticity. The duo characterizes alternative folk with a new sound in the album Phases. Their lead single Water, really shows this unique sound by the effective uses of the variety of instruments in their sound. Think Devendra Banhart meets John Mayer and you have Bonomo. Although two different genres, a mix of such sounds proves auditory greatness.

Art Decade Transforms Symphonic Rock

27 Jan

Art Decade

Whenever I first hear a band that does not conform to the bromidic classifications of a normal rock genre, I immediately explore some category to place the band in, although such a fastidious task is often misguided. Not all bands fit any category though. Such is the case for Boston-based Art Decade, the spawn of the Berklee School of Music mixed with pop overtones.

Art Decade is different, and I like change. Different, though, is only one part of new, exciting music. The tunes need to be good. Fortunately, Art Decade has this covered. On my first listen through their debut album, Western Sunrise, I was immediately shocked by the maturity and complexity of the compositions, but this confusion was satisfied when I observed the talent producing the music (more on this later).

Art Decade is to the 21st century what Electric Light Orchestra/Queen was to the Classic Rock genre. ELO and Queen were some of the pioneers of Symphonic Rock bands of the 1970s. This sub-genre evolved from the Progressive Rock movement (encompassing such bands at the Moody Blues and Emerson Lake & Palmer). Symphonic rock, though, took the sound of Prog/Rock and focused attention to modeling classical compositions and instrumentation and musical complexity. ELO, led by the venerable Jeff Lynne, took this concept and added pop melodies. Thus, the music was intelligent and accessible. Queen also emerged from Prog/Rock and added its own flavor on Symphonic Rock.

Flash forward to the late 20th century and early 21st century, and power/pop bands like Fun, Muse, Guided By Voices, Fountains of Wayne, and Keane bathe listeners with a wall of pop rhythms. Fun, specifically, focuses on creating a world of theatrical pop, an ode to the upbeat sounds of ELO and Queen.

Art Decade has combined Symphonic Rock and Power Pop into an amalgamated super genre of Classical Rock/Pop, which, although some may label it as Indie, is far more compound. The music is multifaceted and intelligent. It is effervescent and enjoyable. It has elements of hard rock, classical music, pop, and a whole lot more pushed into tracks, like a clown car of material – 15 clowns get out and you are wondering how the band fit so many elements into their music. And its clean. It is so tight and well manufactured. It is skillful.

It also makes sense considering that Art Decade’s guitarist/vocalist/arranger Ben Talmi grew up on a diet of classical music and attended Berklee School of Music.

“A strong musical education can do many things to a musician, oftentimes people become jaded with their acquired musical knowledge, becoming frustrated with the state of popular music and its general lack of musical depth,” said Talmi in a press release for Art Decade’s debut release. “Others are unable to escape the education and end up producing very indulgent and selfish music. I truly hope to take what I have learned and apply it in a very mature way.”

“Western Sunrise” is a multifarious piece that implements several classical elements into waves of remarkable instrumentation and mellifluous sounds culminating in a repeated diapason; all wrapped up neatly by a powerful vocal and music video that plays with the ocean motif and a colorful, pointillism-like construction. Oh, and it’s accessible for all ears. The song features so many elements that at some points I think I am listening to Trans-Siberian Orchestra and at other points I think I am listening to Keane. The music oscillates with such precision. I must credit the entire band for this magical composition.

Here is the Pt. 2 of “Western Sunrise,” another sprawling symphonic piece that flows with creative strings, vocals, piano, and other instrumentation. In some ways I am reminded a bit of Paul McCartney’s work with Wings. 

I am excited to hear more from Art Decade, a band that I’m sure you all will be hearing more about in the future.

Check out their website, Facebook, and Twitter.

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